Have a great autumn weekend


FALL seems to have made a sudden and welcome appearance.

Just days ago, the temperatures were in the 80s and 90s but now we are down in the 60s. It does feel good.

The other change is in the fields.

It seems just yesterday the beans and corn were green and now most fields are brown. I have seen farmers out picking both corn and beans. It’s a time of year we need to be extra careful on country roads because there are slow moving tractors and trucks going from one field to another. Be alert.
Seebach’s pumpkin patch is loaded with pumpkins in Flagg Center, as well as hay bales and corn stalks.  Great for fall decorating.

And those pesky Asian beetles seem to be popping up again. These are the ones that look like ladybugs, but they are no ladies! They bite and they stink. I was told that they become a nuisance when soybeans are harvested. But I don’t have a soy bean field anywhere near my house and here they are.

I think it is time for me to get some mums, which will be my weekend project.

Shattered tree

The shattered tree from the 2015 tornado that housed a shrine to the Blessed Virgin Mary on Skare Road at Skare Park has been removed. It was a matter of time because the tree was rotting away.
Also missing is whatever was being built on the southeast corner of Illinois Route 64 and Illinois Route 251. It has been under construction for a while, but now there are just  piles of building material.

Hall of Fame

Congratulations to this year’s RTHS Athletic Hall of Fame inductees. Tom McDermott, Flagg Township Museum historian and city council member, has mentioned  William May several times in past conversations and wondered whey he wasn’t in the Hall. Mr. May was the first state champion in any sport at RTHS, winning the 50 yard dash title in the 1904-5 track season. He also broke the world record. I’m glad Tom brought the man’s accomplishments to light. Sometimes in 100 years people get passed over and forgotten. Now Mr. May will always have a place in RTHS sports.

Lantern fly

Ever hear of a spotted lantern fly? Natives to Asia, they have appeared in the United States, as far west as Indiana.

They are pretty, but  harmful to oaks and other native trees. Several agencies are recommending killing the bugs on sight to prevent their spread.

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